The “Evil Breeder” Mentality

The “Evil Breeder” Mentality is not an affliction that plagues breeders, causing them to do evil things. It is a condition by which people involved in rescue lump all breeders into the “Evil Breeder” category and point the dreaded bony finger of blame for any and all pets sitting in shelters and rescues.  And just like any virus, it can spread, but does not necessarily afflict everyone.

It is important to differentiate between the different types of rescues, just as it is important to differentiate between ethical breeders and puppy mills. But wait, I’m getting ahead of myself.

First, WHY NOT point a finger at breeders… whichever finger that may be?  Why shouldn’t breeders be blamed?  Obviously if “manufacturers” churn out more “product” when there is too much on the shelves, it’s the manufacturers’ fault, right?

Before getting too deep into the article, I must first attempt the impossible.  The difficulty of this task is the very reason I am writing this today. I must first help many of those involved in rescue to understand there is a difference between “breeders” and “reputable breeders”.  Unfortunately this is where many rescuers will stop reading and cling religiously to their hate for anyone who has ever produced a litter. But those who read on, understand that knowledge is power and sometimes coming together for a common goal is more important than clinging to false beliefs. And I believe those people will be pleasantly surprised.

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I was recently referred to as a “low life breeder”, who dared talk ethics to people involved in rescue.  Within the same 48 hours, I had a conversation with someone else who talked down to me… again, because I’m a breeder. They said I only deal with “perfect dogs” and that “breeders never do anything for rescue”.

Scratching my head, I tried to figure out exactly who it was who has offered to help local rescues with transport, who has donated to rescue related auctions, who has purchased from rescue related auctions, who has flat out donated money, who had spread the word about numerous homeless dogs, who refers people to Petfinder rescues on their website….. who was that person?

Apparently it couldn’t have been me. I’m a “low life” breeder.

Then I thought about the local and national clubs I’m involved with.  Which organizations set up auctions to benefit rescues? Which clubs coordinate with rescue efforts in every area, hold auctions, and donate to rescues every year? Which clubs even have their own committees in charge of supporting rescue efforts?

Why that couldn’t possibly be local and national breed clubs…. they are made up of breeders, and those “low life” breeders don’t help rescue.

Or do they?

Actually the concept of “breed rescues” first came into being when breeders saw dogs of their breed at shelters and coordinated efforts to save them from an uncertain future by pulling them before they were euthanized, and placing them in good homes.  Breeders not only support rescue efforts, they created the concept.

But that still doesn’t mean it’s okay to breed, because those puppies end up in shelters and rescues en masse, right? And breeders profit off of puppy sales while thousands of puppies they produce die because they do not have homes.  Right?

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Well let’s look at how reputable breeders typically place their puppies.  This is not set in stone for all reputable breeders, but this process is pretty standard.  First, the prospective puppy buyer stays on a waiting list for anywhere from a few weeks to two plus years.  We are not out there marketing our puppies because we can’t place them, taking potential homes.  Buyers who wait a few weeks to two years have typically researched the breed that is appropriate for their home or circumstance, and they have plenty of time to consider other alternatives. Because there is a wait, reputable breeders often suggest that potential buyers consider a rescue.  Most continue to wait, because they can not usually get what they specifically want from a rescue or shelter. It is their right and their choice to decide what is the proper fit for their home.

Reputable breeders health test their breeding dogs for hereditary health issues, investing at least hundreds but usually thousands of dollars over the years, doing their best to screen out potential health issues before the breeding is even planned. They spend even more money showing dogs and proving the quality of their structure and breed type.  The breeding is often planned many months, often years, in advance. Pedigrees, health and conformation are taken into consideration in an attempt to produce a healthy puppy that is a good representative of the breed.

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Then when a litter is born, the reputable breeder evaluates them for weeks before deciding which is their next show prospect, and which will go to other homes.  When those puppies go to their new families, the homes are first screened carefully and the puppies are placed on a contract. Reputable breeders require spay/neuter contracts on all pet puppies and there are stipulations about providing proper care.  They also require the puppy to be returned to them if ever the owner cannot keep them for any reason. Often very strict penalties are attached to failing to follow these stipulations.

So, puppies are produced with health and longevity in mind, with a breeder doing their best to avoid producing puppies that might have health challenges, reducing their chances of having to be re-homed. Then they screen potential owners so again, the puppies have the best chance of having a forever home with responsible pet owners. Then the contract requires the puppies to be spayed or neutered if they are pets, and if the owner is not able to keep them for any reason, the breeder will take them back without hesitation.

Then how on earth are these puppies cluttering up all of the shelters? Especially if “all breeders are the same”.

But what kind of health testing and screening does your typical backyard or profit motivated breeders do? What kind of contract? Would they take a puppy back without hesitation? What do they do to ensure their puppies will never end up in a shelter? Would they take regular financial losses if it meant doing what is best for the breed and for any puppies they produced?  Usually the extent of their concern is if the orders keep coming and the checks cash.

And what about the litters that result from people breeding their pets for “fun”, or to make a few bucks, or to experiment with crossing different breeds to see what they get? Or the accidental breedings because they simply haven’t spayed or neutered their pet yet? And when they find homes for those puppies, do they screen the homes? Do they offer to take them back if the buyer can’t keep them? How do they ensure those puppies do not end up in shelters once the cuteness wears off?  Most of those puppies are purchased on impulse, without much commitment or investment, and many end up in shelters at one time or another.

ARE all breeders the same?  REALLY?

Reputable breeders who truly love and are dedicated to the breed, spend countless hours and many sleepless nights with each and every litter.  They shed tears for puppies that pass away or for those elderly dogs they have helped to cross the rainbow bridge after a lifetime of love. They sacrifice comforts of their own so their dogs can have quality food and vet care. They make sure their dogs are well socialized, healthy, and sound. They spend their money on health testing, show expenses and vet bills when they could be taking vacations.  They pour their hearts into their dogs, taking a lifetime of responsibility for each one of them.  And though they don’t make money on their efforts, at least they get appreciation and respect, right?  No, they get spit on for it.  They are called “Greeders” and “Puppy Mills” and are made to feel guilty for all of their hard work, dedication and love. I still haven’t figured out how I can lose approximately $3-5K per year and still be considered “greedy”.   But whatever… right?

Even though their dogs are kept comfortably in their home and pampered, they are lumped together with breeders who cram dogs into rusty cages stacked five high and ten wide in a shed, and who sell puppies in bulk to pet stores or via online shopping carts.  In the eyes of many rescues, a puppy yanked from a dirty box with its eyes matted shut and shipped off to an unsuspecting buyer is no less responsibly produced than a healthy one raised bedside with the breeder, carrying a guaranteed lifetime home, and placed only after careful screening.

But behind the scenes, these reputable breeders are helping rescues by spreading the word about homeless dogs of their breed. They are buying things at auctions to benefit rescues. They are donating items to auctions to benefit rescues.  They are making cash donations. They are helping with transporting rescued dogs. They are fostering rescued dogs.  They are taking their own dogs back when needed. They are their breed rescues’ cheerleaders and supporters.

Or should I saw “WE” are.  I donated an item not too long ago that brought quite a decent amount at an online auction to benefit rescue… the same person who accepted and thanked me for my donation later called me a “low life breeder”.  Does that make sense? It makes as much sense as breed rescues alienating the most enthusiastic supporters of their breed.

Isn’t it usually supposed to be a dog that bites the hand that feeds them?  But what are rescues doing when they condemn all breeders? What are they doing to help the dogs by calling those that support them “puppy mills” and turning a blind eye to the differences in their practices?  Does it support the cause to eliminate supporters and donations?  Does it support the cause to punish breeders who take responsibility for their dogs?  Who are they hurting in the end?

So many rescue advocates are being pulled into the anti-breeder, anti-ALL-breeder mentality, that they do not realize that the animal rights extremists want to eliminate dogs from the home altogether, and tearing us down is just helping them out.

Is the rescuer’s goal really to eliminate all dogs? We’re all animal lovers. Shouldn’t we unite towards the common goal of promoting responsible pet ownership and stopping cruelty?  

You will be hard pressed to find people who are more  passionate about dogs than those who live and breathe them every day like a responsible breeder.  Harness that passion, don’t try to snuff it out, and together we can accomplish so much more than ever imagined.

 

Addition added 2/4/2016:

I had a comment below that addressed the issue of the fact that breeders, despite the fact they breed responsibly, are still producing more dogs, which take homes from other dogs who are homeless.  My response was too long, so I added the comments below. –
First of all, if every dog could have a home if there were simply less dogs, why are rescues importing hundreds of thousands of dogs from other countries? For example, the golden retrievers that were imported not long ago. The shelter owner happily told the media that nearly 100 rescues for Golden Retrievers had long waiting lists they could not fill. Why couldn’t other dogs be placed in those homes? Because people want certain dogs with certain traits. Even rescues and shelters understand this. That is why more highly adoptable dogs are being shipped in from other shelters while less desirable breeds are euthanized by the thousands. I’m not saying this is fair, but it is a fact.

You also cannot say any dog will be a correct fit for every home. A high drive dog is not a good fit for someone with a sedentary lifestyle. A fluffy couch potato is not the right fit for someone who wants their property patrolled or who wants a jogging buddy. A “no cats” dog won’t fit in every home, a “no children” dog won’t fit in every home. Many parents will not purchase pit type dogs for a home with young children. Whether or not it’s a well founded fear, it is a fact that many will go without, rather than purchase a breed they are not comfortable with. Some are not equipped to handle a special needs dog. Some do not want their children to experience the loss of a pet so soon by purchasing an elderly dog. Even someone’s home and yard set up affects their decision on what type of dog will fit their family best and when all of these things are considered, THERE IS A STRONGER CHANCE OF A FOREVER HOME. Feeling bad for a dog that is homeless and adopting the wrong dog into the wrong situation might be even more dangerous for all involved than euthanization.

As to the assertions that a responsibly bred dog is not “better” and that it’s “snobbery” to say they are…..  There’s not a day that goes by that  some responsible breeder somewhere doesn’t receive an inquiry from someone who purchased an irresponsibly bred dog and is heartbroken because of it.  If a responsibly bred dog has no advantages, why in the world are we health testing, socializing, breeding for soundness and structure?  At the risk of participating in “snobbery”, I will most certainly say that in most cases, a responsibly bred dog IS BETTER.  How can someone say that a dog that has been DNA tested and is guaranteed not to go blind by the age of 2 is not better? What about a dog whose sire and dam have excellent hips or sound patellas versus a dog whose relatives limped in pain by the age of 5?  It doesn’t mean the dog isn’t deserving of a good home or have a good heart, but when owners are not faced with thousands of dollars in vet bills to correct a problem a responsible breeder could have prevented, the dog  has a better chance of living a long happy life with their owner. And the owner won’t be faced with the decision to find the money to fix the issue, or give the dog up, or put it to sleep. That’s not to say there aren’t a lot of healthy shelter/rescue dogs, it’s only to say that there is less chance of an issue if the dog and it’s relatives have been screened to be free of issues common in the breed.

I understand the tendency to be hesitant to say a well bred dog is “better”, but it is most certainly BETTER for a dog to be well bred.

Potential pet owners who research and contact reputable breeders, have done so for many of the reasons above and they have chosen the breed that is the right fit for them.  They have also chosen a reputable breeder who they are more likely to get a healthy pet from, that comes with a health guarantee and breeder support, increasing the chances of their pet living a long life with them.

Bless those who adopt, but it’s not for everyone and the fact that many breeders can never have enough puppies to fulfill their waiting lists is testament to the fact that some WILL always shop, and that is their choice and their right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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22 thoughts on “The “Evil Breeder” Mentality

  1. I LOVE this article!
    I would be honored to publish it in my dog magazine (please check contact info bellow – its hidden from public).

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  2. I am in rescue, and fully understand the difference between a reputable breeder and a puppy mill. However, I still don’t see why anyone should be purposely breeding more dogs when thousands are killed daily for lack of a home. Because your dog’s are “better”? Please. That simply isn’t true, and it’s pure snobbery to insist it is. There is simply no denying that more dogs born equals more dogs killed.

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    1. Thank you for your comments Jennifer. You bring up a valid point I’d like to address.

      I’m not sure you do understand the difference between a reputable breeder and a puppy mill since you do not understand the difference in the dogs they produce.

      My reply is too long for this section. Please see the addition to the article above.

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    2. Jennifer, as to your statement that “there is simply no denying that more dogs born equals more dogs killed.” I will personally deny it, for a couple reasons.

      Do you have a favorite breed? Almost everyone, including the most staunch individuals involved in rescue that I’ve personally been in contact with, has a favorite breed. Why is that? Do you like the way they look? Do you like their personalities? Their size, or perhaps coat type? Or, more likely, all of those things at once? If, like most people, you have a favorite breed, then it’s rather hypocritical to not enable yourself to envision a place in modern society for breeders. After all, if nobody bred dogs, breeds would cease to exist. In fact, if everyone suddenly stopped breeding dogs, domesticated dogs as we know them would go extinct within relatively few years. Left to their own devices, feral dog populations generally take on a similar, primitive appearance, and inherit temperaments that would make them unsuitable as pets in most homes. After all, they’re governed by natural selection and survival of the fittest, not selectively bred for the traits that suit us humans.

      From a buyer’s perspective, let me just throw this out there, and it will come as a shock to (and probably deeply offend) many of the rescue people who will read it: I DON’T WANT A RESCUE DOG. Full stop. From that viewpoint forward, absolutely none of the decisions I make determines whether or not a dog in a shelter is going to the euthanasia room. If, for some reason, I don’t have the option to get a dog from a responsible breeder, I’m not suddenly going to decide to go to the pound and pick up that dog with unknown lineage or history, with indeterminate potential genetic health and/or temperament issues. I’m simply not going to get a dog. Inversely, a puppy I get from a responsible breeder is not “taking the place” of a puppy from a shelter or rescue, because I wasn’t going to take the rescue or shelter puppy if the breeder’s puppy wasn’t available to me.

      Make sense?

      Liked by 3 people

    3. As “rescurers” spout that their dogs are superior versus a planned & scrutinized breeding, I have noticed that when a puppy mill is “busted” and dogs/puppies taken to be placed, so the very dogs you are protesting are most likely the pets being placed by the rescues who took them on. There are very few actual breeders who upon careful planning get a serious birth defect, and they reasearch both parents and have detailed records of Generations of related dogs. With a breeder ,they will remove a dog from the gene pool if a genetic defect is uncovered. When profit is a concern, the puppy mill will not mind defects that are hidden until after a puppy has been taken home. Then, it’s not their problem.

      The other issue is the people getting a dog and not realizing that it is a commitment for the dogs life, not until the kids go to college, or they move away. The throwaway mentality is a bigger problem than ANY breeder could ever be. And no questionnaires yet designed could predict why and when a home goes sour. Just because they have a fence does not guarantee a sound placement choice that will never sour or collapse onto itself.

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  3. I am a breeder. And a person who shows. And a person who rescues. They are NOT mutually exclusive. Guess what I’m doing this weekend. Picking up and taking in a rescue.

    Part of the problem is terminology – the disreputable breeders have learned that people get a feel-good high out of “adopting” a dog – so they charge “adoption” fees. People who want to get rid of a dog charge an “adoption fee” so that the person who buys them say they “rescued” their dog. People are shamed for purchasing a well-bred puppy from a reputable breeder for not saving a dog from a shelter instead.

    The truth of the matter is that some people need to know the temperament of the dog they are getting. They have a household that runs a specific way – if it’s a laid back household, a Border Collie is just not going to fit in. If it’s a busy, active houshold, a sedentary breed might not be happy there. With mixed breeds, you have even less of a chance of knowing that a dog’s temperament will be. I have owned purebreds and mixed breeds, and each have their own unique characteristics. There is nothing wrong with doing your research and knowing what you can give a dog and what a dog will bring to your household.

    I would hazard a guess that far more dogs end up in shelters because people don’t research and don’t plan. They just want “a puppy”… any old puppy will do. But when the puppy grows up to be too big, too loud, too energetic, etc., the puppy/dog is the one who suffers. More than anything we need people who will take responsibility for the dogs they bring into their households. Dogs are a lifetime commitment. In our throw-away society, we’ve made it too easy for people to just dump them when they want to. And that is NOT a breeder’s fault.

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  4. Jennifer, as to your statement that “there is simply no denying that more dogs born equals more dogs killed.” I will personally deny it, for a couple reasons.

    Do you have a favorite breed? Almost everyone, including the most staunch individuals involved in rescue that I’ve personally been in contact with, has a favorite breed. Why is that? Do you like the way they look? Do you like their personalities? Their size, or perhaps coat type? Or, more likely, all of those things at once? If, like most people, you have a favorite breed, then it’s rather hypocritical to not enable yourself to envision a place in modern society for breeders. After all, if nobody bred dogs, breeds would cease to exist. In fact, if everyone suddenly stopped breeding dogs, domesticated dogs as we know them would go extinct within relatively few years. Left to their own devices, feral dog populations generally take on a similar, primitive appearance, and inherit temperaments that would make them unsuitable as pets in most homes. After all, they’re governed by natural selection and survival of the fittest, not selectively bred for the traits that suit us humans.

    From a buyer’s perspective, let me just throw this out there, and it will come as a shock to (and probably deeply offend) many of the rescue people who will read it: I DON’T WANT A RESCUE DOG. Full stop. From that viewpoint forward, absolutely none of the decisions I make determines whether or not a dog in a shelter is going to the euthanasia room. If, for some reason, I don’t have the option to get a dog from a responsible breeder, I’m not suddenly going to decide to go to the pound and pick up that dog with unknown lineage or history, with indeterminate potential genetic health and/or temperament issues. I’m simply not going to get a dog. Inversely, a puppy I get from a responsible breeder is not “taking the place” of a puppy from a shelter or rescue, because I wasn’t going to take the rescue or shelter puppy if the breeder’s puppy wasn’t available to me.

    Make sense?

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  5. Wow. So well said!! I breed and I rescue Boston Terriers. This article could have been written by me (only you said it so much better than I could have). I totally understand that some people only want a puppy and some people only want to rescue. I live that….. My husband loves puppies and I love old dogs…. my rescues are my heart. There isn’t anything I wouldn’t do to rescue a Boston Terrier and get it to a safe home. I support rescues and I do not like uneducated breeders who think there is money in breeding. Trust me… there is no money made in breeding if it’s done right. It costs a lot to feed, vaccinate, buy treats and toys … oh and cloths. I’ve never made money in breeding in 9 years. I do it solely for the love of the breed.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, there is often money to be lost in breeding as well. Between vet costs, vaccinations, quality food and supplies…. AND HEALTH TESTING. There is nothing more important in responsible breeding than that, and that is often one of the bigger expenses, outside of showing or the big unexpected vet bills.

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  6. There are many different kinds of dogs in shelters. No responsible rescue adopts dogs to families they aren’t well suited for. People insist on purebred dogs because snobs like you have convinced them that they are better. They are not better, they are not healthier. You can say they are, but there is no evidence to support that. If everyone ceased the breeding snobbery, dogs would just be dogs, and no one would need to have a “pure” (that’s a misnomer) bred one as a status symbol. Every dog born is another dog killed, and no one who truly cares about dogs would participate in that.

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    1. Jennifer, I don’t think you are reading a single response to your statement. Either that or you refuse to acknowledge how the general public feels or views the subject. These are the same kinds of behaviors that Allie mentioned. Had you read and let the information sink in, you would realize it’s not about being “pure”, it’s about different dogs bred for different things. Years ago I had a Boxer and an Aussie. The Aussie was a rescue and a wonderful dog but she chased the Boxer around the yard, grabbing onto her back legs to the point of leaving sores. She did it because that’s what she was bred to do, just as if I had gone out and bought an Aussie puppy. I didn’t have cattle and I didn’t let her chase the horses, so she had to use her natural instincts one way or another. Just as any working dog will. Just as a dog bred to be a companion wants to sit on the couch and not go for a jog. It’s NOT SNOBBERY, it’s CAREFULLY THOUGHT OUT PLACEMENT OF PETS IN A HOME on the part of a responsible pet owner. I don’t know how I can say it more plainly so you understand. And believe me, being the “dog lady” in my family, around co-workers, among friends and among my neighbors has absolutely NOTHING to do with status. It’s hard non-glamorous work every single day. Right now “saving” (buying) a dog from a shelter is the current “status symbol”.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. A great and well written article. Completely agree with the need for good responsible breeders and wish there were more like you. I waited 18 months for the right dog from the right breeder and I am so glad I did. It gave us chance to really think about what we were doing before bringing our pup home. There are many reasons why people want a certain type or breed of dog and for my family circumstances it was vitality important that I knew exactly what I was getting and that he would have an excellent temperament. While I completely support the work of rescues and I have always had rescue dogs in the past, there are times when people want a particular dog to fit their lifestyle and family.
    As a veterinary nurse I see the full scale of the unwanted dog problem. In the UK our rescues are full to bursting thanks in part to backyard breeders and puppy farmers – with no waiting, people just impulse buy from these places without really thinking about what they are taking on and we seem to live in a time where for some, it is completely acceptable to discard the young adult dog that has suddenly become a nuisance

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  8. I have no purebred dogs at this time and haven’t for many years. I have two mutts. One big dog we picked up on the highway as a puppy and a small dog I got from a friend as a puppy. I 100 % agree with Jani. I did have and even raised Boxers for a number of years many years ago. My next dog of choice that I want to own will be a non shedding dog of some breed. Probably a crossbred like a Aussiedoodle. That is my right to pick a designer dog if that is what I choose. If I come across an acceptable one in a shelter or rescue that would be alright too.

    Rescue dogs are not for everyone. So many have issues that I personally don’t care to deal with and habits that are totally unacceptable to me. I don’t think I have hardly ever seen a rescue dog picture that the dog isn’t on furniture or on a bed. I love my dogs and they are well cared for, but have never allowed a dog on furniture or a bed. They have their own cushy beds and are trained to stay where you tell them. I have had 6 back surgeries and could not even began to keep all the hair vacuumed up that they shed. I want my furniture and bed to be clean. I don’t want my clothes full of dog hair or my company’s. My dogs run around out in the barn yard with me every day and I sure don’t want them on my furniture. I have chickens and other animals that I don’t want a dog to kill. So many rescue dogs you could never trust with all of your other animals. I have always trained my dogs from puppies that they could not harm any other animal. Yes, there are some good ones out there too. It is totally up to each individual what kind of dog they want and where they want to purchase them from.

    It would be very sad world I think if there wasn’t all of the beautiful purebred dogs and big dog shows like Westminster. And all of the many shows across the country like Jani and so many reputable breeders show their dogs in. People enjoy breeding, promoting and showing their dogs. That is their God-given right and not to be condemned for it. Puppy mills and abuse are a totally different thing. They are not remotely in the same category. Who could look at Jani’s beautiful healthy well cared for dogs and not admit how pretty and well cared for they are. People invest thousands of dollars into their purebred dogs with their care and showing. It is something that they love to do. Who has the right to say that they cannot do it and should have mutts from a shelter or rescue? I personally love seeing the pictures Jani’s beautiful dogs and cute little puppies when they are born that she shares. And, seeing her posts on her show wins and the news of her dogs being placed into loving wonderful homes. She should be very proud and I know that she is. :o)

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  9. Jennifer, in the past every dog I had came from the local shelter. Cooper the Schnauzer mix, Birdie the Vizla mix and then a puppy, Carly the greatdane/Catahoula mix. Cooper had some ingrained behavior that made it very hard to love him, but I did. Birdie ate my Mom’s cat, constantly dug and would run away any chance she got. I invested a lot of time in obedience and handling classes. She could not be trusted and ended up spending a lot of time in a kennel. So then I thought I better try a puppy next time so along came Carly. She grew up to be a great dog with none of the inherent traits the others had because I started her right and was consistant in her training. She was the star of the neighborhood and loved by everyone from the mailman to the police who would visit next door on a regular basis. When she was barely 4 her hips went and then by 5 she was blind at 6 she had tumors and became a skeleton. It was so sad and hard to watch my beloved girl be miserable and she hated going to the vets. After Carly I got an unpapered Rat Terrier pup from a backyard breeder and spent a lot of money because she had worms and had not had her shots and got parvo, but she survived and is my best friend. My Heart dog. My next dog I did my homeword and sought out a reputable breeder who did all the OFA and health test that Boston Terriers require. I got a beautiful dog for companionship and to show. I used to have horses and due to age and arthritis I could no longer ride so needed something to fill the void and decided to try showing dogs. It has saved me from depression and given me a purpose and a passion to replace my loss of horses. It’s fun and I have met some really great people. I support rescue, but it would be such a sad world if there were no specific breed of dogs to give people pleasure. It’s a choice to purchase a dog or rescue one and I think there is a great balance of people who adopt and people who purchase. They both work hard to ensure good homes for the dogs.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Love the article, thank you. Will share!
    Now please elaborate on the “rescuers” LOL…. Being in the veterinary business I have to deal with so many different of them and there are a lot of “reputable rescues” and the just plain “rescues” … Most make a lot of money, and plain sell their dogs for an exorbitant “adoption fee” ! Others seem to be hoarders instead, collecting dogs who are never adopted, but occasionally fostered. Not to mention that most in my area import puppies from shelters in other states to supply the demand for “rescue dogs” here. Everybody wants to be a hero and adopting a rescue dog seems to make you one now a days. What those heroes don’t understand is that, the more they “adopt”, the higher the demand for rescued adoptable dogs, the more rescues will sprout and flourish in the area with even more dogs to be adopted.
    Then the well intentioned family who wants a specific breed can’t find a rescue purebred dog in their area, not in shelters or rescue adoptions, so they look for breeders and while in waiting lists go to a pet store and “feel bad” for the life those puppies have… and buy one! So now they consider themselves “rescuers” and “heroes” too, since the puppy now will have a better life, but by buying the deformed, sick, starved, caged, puppy mill bred pet store puppy they are fomenting the next generation of red bostons, blue eyes and all, or spotted schnauzers, shit-poohs or bull-shits or cockapoos or weimaroodles whatever disgusting new name they find for their misfits.

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    1. Thank you for sharing! Great observations as well. The “Rescue” is COSR, the director is Penny Sanderbeck. The dog is CH Legacies Pipe Dream AKA Piper. For additional details, scroll back through some of my 2015 articles. There’s a lot more to the story! 🙂

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  11. I love your blog! I’m starting one up myself and if it is okay with you I’d love to add a link to this site under my resources page. I’ll leave you my blog website address so you can check it out. 🙂

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